Bodmin Moor

Bodmin Moor: Rough Tor

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Rough Tor

Rough Tor is the second highest point on Bodmin Moor, and in Cornwall. It’s a particularly striking and atmospheric feature of Bodmin Moor, as its rocky summit is topped with boulders piled up in a unique way. Climbing Rough Tor gives a great view over the surrounding Cornish countryside. Walking to Rough Tor involves crossing […]

Cambridge

Peterhouse Garden in Springtime

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The garden at Peterhouse has been beautiful over the past few weeks. The college has a large back garden contained within an old stone wall, and the whole lawn has been completely covered with daffodils. The garden lies behind the Fitzwilliam Museum, and extends a long way. I visited Peterhouse garden a few times within […]

Bodmin Moor

Bodmin Moor

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The ancient landscape of Bodmin Moor has been occupied for over 10,000 years. While walking over the moorland you can find the remains of Bronze Age settlements fairly easily, as the stones of round houses are half-submerged in grass. Archeological evidence has shown that Mesolithic hunter gatherers and Neolithic early farmers also occupied this part […]

Cambridge

Old Library, Queens’ College

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The Old Library at Queens’ College was opened to the public for a few weeks in February and early March. This beautiful place is still equipped with its original medieval lecterns. The floor and fittings are made of dark wood, making the library very atmospheric. I love the old volumes that surround you in the […]

Devon

A Cove in North Devon

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  Walking the South West Coast Path is a chance to discover some beautiful and soul-stirring scenery. I explored the coast path in North Devon, and I loved the rocky cliffs, crashing surf, and the pink thrift flowering everywhere. The coastline here is often strewn with fallen boulders that have dropped into the sea from […]

Andalucia

Sand sculpture in Cádiz

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At the far end of Cádiz at Playa de la Caleta, the city peters out into a long pier and the Atlantic Ocean. Wandering here at sunset, I came across a steel drum band playing, and an artist carefully tending his sand sculpture. The sculpture has an amazing amount of detail, and depicts an octopus, […]

United Kingdom

Snowdonian Lakes

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The walk between these two Snowdonian lakes, Llyn Ogwen and Llyn Idwal, was sublime on a blustery summer day. We trekked up towards the mountains in search of the Devil’s Kitchen, a tall jagged rock formation around a dark, boulder-strewn alley. The sunlight reflecting off the surface of the lake gives Llyn Idwal (on the right) […]

Cambridge

Emmanuel College

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Founded by the Chancellor of the Exchequer in the time of Elizabeth I, Emmanuel College was originally intended as a home for Puritan beliefs. Today Emmanuel is known for its striped formal lawn in Front Court, its Wren chapel (one of only two in Cambridge), its swimming pool, and beautiful large paddock with a pond […]

Wales

The Ugly House, Snowdonia

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On a road through Snowdonia, a unique stone cottage sits on a sharp bend, among quiet trees. Just off the roadside, the cottage is made of stones so large they are almost boulder sized. It is known as the Ugly House, Tŷ Hyll. The Ugly House is situated near a bridge, which runs over the […]

Andalucia

Plaza de España, Seville

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I loved exploring the Plaza de España in Seville. It was my favourite place in the city when I visited in May. Surrounded by lakes, bridges and fountains, the Plaza de España is a sweeping, palatial building full of alcoves that represent each of Spain’s provinces. Beautiful bridges span the ornamental lake. The Plaza de España […]

Croatia

Plitvice Lakes: the Upper Lakes

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In early October I visited Croatia. I’ve wanted to go to Croatia for several years, so was excited to land in Zadar, a coastal city with classical ruins and buildings made of white stone. After exploring Zadar we travelled inland by bus, across beautiful misty mountains and moor. The climate and scenery changed, as we […]

Cambridge

King’s College

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King’s College is one of Cambridge’s most famous colleges, and its chapel has come to represent the city as a whole, as the emblem of the city council and perhaps Cambridge’s most iconic and recognisable landmark. Viewing the city from the castle mound, King’s chapel dominates the Cambridge skyline. The view towards the city centre […]

Cambridge

Autumn colours in Virginia creeper

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The Pitt Building on Trumpington Street in Cambridge has been the headquarters of Cambridge University Press for over a hundred years. The back of the building is covered with Virginia creeper and is one of the best places in the city to observe the colour change into autumn as the foliage changes from green to […]

Cornwall

Old Post Office, Tintagel

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In the heart of Tintagel village, on the Cornish coast, lies this 14th century cottage. The building was a yeoman’s farmhouse for centuries. It became a post office in the Victorian period, when it acquired a licence to be a letter receiving station for the district around Tintagel. Inside the Old Post Office are Victorian […]

Cambridge

Lucy Cavendish College

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Lucy Cavendish is not a well-known college, perhaps to the delight of its students. It is not on the tourist trail, but set among the ‘hill colleges’ near the Castle mound. Even there, it is not a large, obvious college like Fitzwilliam or Churchill, and is tucked away off a little side road. Lucy Cavendish […]

Cambridge

Robinson College

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Robinson College is the youngest college in Cambridge. It was founded in 1979. Robinson College was created after a £17 million gift was made to the University of Cambridge by Sir David Robinson, a British entrepreneur and philanthropist, for the purpose of founding a new college in Cambridge. Constructed entirely of distinctive red brick, Robinson […]

Cambridge

Newnham College

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An incredibly photogenic college, Newnham lies a little way off the beaten track. Newnham College was founded in 1871 by Henry Sidgwick, as Cambridge University’s second college for women. The first women’s college in Cambridge was Girton College, which was founded two years earlier. In Cambridge, Newnham is both the name of a college, and […]

Cambridge

Clare Hall

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Clare Hall is perhaps the most unusual-looking of the Cambridge colleges, and makes for a surprising visit. Designed more akin to a block of 1960s flats than a traditional college, Clare Hall nonetheless has an interesting history. Clare Hall was founded in 1966 directly by Clare College, as a college of advanced study that would […]

Cambridge

Clare College

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Founded in 1326, Clare College is the second oldest college in Cambridge. Clare College has perhaps the best location of all the Cambridge colleges: a site that spans both sides of the river, and is right in the city centre, off the pedestrianised and picturesque Trinity Lane. Set in the heart of the old University […]

Cambridge

St Catharine’s College

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I was lucky enough to pass St Catharine’s College on an open day in June. It happened to be a beautiful day as well. Many Cambridge colleges were open on this day to invite prospective students and the public in to look around, including nearby Peterhouse, Pembroke and Corpus. I knew I had to take […]

England

A canal in King’s Cross

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Regent’s Canal in London runs through the heart of the King’s Cross area of the city. I stumbled across the canal at the weekend, on my way to the Guardian offices. Although only a stone’s throw from the busy hub of King’s Cross station, the canal forms an amazing nine mile waterway through London. The […]

United Kingdom

Pembroke College

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A remarkably friendly and open college, Pembroke is also beautiful, and very old. The delights of wandering its grounds – noticing another Gothic archway, a cat-flap cut into a modern door in a medieval building, or simply enjoying the gardens – do not diminish no matter how often you visit. This college lies directly on the […]

United Kingdom

Cambridge Colleges

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The University of Cambridge has 31 constituent colleges. This summer I am visiting them all, from medieval Peterhouse to modern Robinson. Click the links to read about each college. A few colleges already have posts, others are still to come – so please check back later for these ones. As I add posts for more […]

Cambridge

Darwin College

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One of the newer colleges of the University of Cambridge, Darwin College nonetheless possesses old buildings, including this beautiful old granary on the banks of the River Cam. An interesting fusion of modern and old buildings, Darwin’s real delight lies in its pretty and secluded riverside gardens. The gardens are separated into alcoves that run […]

Spain

Roman Temple, Cordoba

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A Roman temple sits on a hill above the old city, on what would have been the eastern edge of Cordoba in Roman times. From there it would have been easily visible for miles around, and a striking symbol of imperial power. The temple’s construction was begun in approximately 41 AD and completed in 81 […]

Spain

Cordoba

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We arrived in Cordoba by train. It was 34 degrees when we arrived so not as hot as Seville. The train had been spacious, clean and air-conditioned, and heading for Malaga. We were impressed as it was much nicer than British trains. We caught a bus from the train station and after a quick journey […]

Cambridge

Christ’s College

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The Alma mater of Charles Darwin and John Milton, Christ’s is an established older college in Cambridge. Christ’s was founded in 1505, by a woman, Lady Margaret Beaufort, which makes it something rather special. The Founder Margaret Beaufort was one of the richest women in medieval England, the mother of Henry Tudor (Henry VII), and […]

Spain

Seville

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Seville was stop one on my tour of Andalucia, the southernmost region of Spain. We flew from Stansted, over the Pyrenees mountains, laced with snow. Further south the land became brown and dry, despite the presence of rivers and large lakes. There were fields and fields of orange trees, planted in orderly rows. Near Seville […]

United Kingdom

Jesus College

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The day after Easter Monday I took my camera and walked into the city. It was beautiful weather and felt like the first day of summer. I had just been to buy a new backpack for my upcoming trip to Spain. In the shop they just cut off the tags and I didn’t have a […]

United Kingdom

Senate House

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While walking in the city yesterday evening, I stumbled across a light show at Senate House. Senate House lies in the old city centre of Cambridge. It stands between King’s and Caius, behind the market place and the University church of Great St Mary’s. The Senate House provides an important function of the University, as […]

United Kingdom

St Bride's Church

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I stumbled upon St Bride’s Church when wandering through narrow alleyways between Temple and Fleet Street. It is a church designed by Sir Christopher Wren, architect of St Paul’s.   The interior of the church is strikingly beautiful. The floor is made of black and white squares of marble, surrounded by dark panelled wood. There […]

United Kingdom

Gonville & Caius College

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Gonville & Caius College is one of the oldest Cambridge colleges, founded in 1348. Gonville & Caius sundial, Senate House Passage I had been wanting to see the inside of the college for a while, having walked past the outside for years. So I went for a wander around one sunny lunchtime. There was a […]

United Kingdom

Trinity Hall

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Trinity Hall is a small, beautiful college, and one of the oldest in Cambridge.  Occupying a site beside the river, nestled between Trinity College and Clare College, Trinity Hall is in the heart of the old university area.  Its near neighbours include Gonville and Caius College, the University’s Old Schools, Clare College, Trinity College, and […]

Top Posts

Exmoor – Tarr Steps

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Tarr Steps is an ancient packhorse bridge in Exmoor.  Made of huge slabs of stone, no-one really knows how old it is, or how it was built, but estimates date back to 1000 BC. The National Park of Exmoor is full of rivers, forest and wildflowers, and spreads across Devon and Somerset. Wild ponies roam the […]

United Kingdom

Tour de France, Cambridge

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The Tour de France runs through Cambridge this year, on one of the stages of the race that is set in Britain. The Tour started in Yorkshire on Saturday 5th July, and today I went out to see the race as it passed through Cambridgeshire. Stage 3 of the Tour de France 2014 started off […]

United Kingdom

Bath Abbey

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A former Benedictine monastery founded in the 7th century, Bath Abbey is an impressive cathedral in the centre of Bath.   Its full title is the Abbey Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul, Bath, but is more commonly known as Bath Abbey. Bath Abbey lies close to the Roman Baths, and when walking around […]

United Kingdom

Twilight on the River Thames

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We crossed the Millennium Footbridge in twilight as the sun was setting over the river, having walked from St Paul’s Cathedral. The moon was coming out, brightening in the deep blue sky of a summer evening. The lights reflecting on the water were beautiful.  We could see down the Thames towards Tower Bridge, with Southwark […]

United Kingdom

St Paul's

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On a trip to London with my girlfriend, we headed for St Paul’s just before sunset. There are roses of many colours growing up against the cathedral railings.  They made for picturesque shots of the cathedral with a cloudless summer sky as background. Slanted evening light fell across the front of St Paul’s as the […]

United Kingdom

Cheddar Caves

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The caves at Cheddar form an intricate and deep network of caverns hollowed out naturally by the action of water, over millennia. The caves were formed by the chemical reaction between water and limestone, which makes a weak carbonic acid.  Rainwater easily erodes this rock, dissolving the limestone. A body known as Cheddar Man was […]

United Kingdom

Mathematical Bridge

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The Mathematical Bridge in Cambridge is famous for its unusual design.  Although it appears to be an arch, the bridge is built entirely of straight timbers.  Its component pieces are arranged at tangents that create a strong, self-supporting structure when pressure is applied to them all together.  Originally built in 1749, it has been rebuilt […]

Cornwall

Porthcurno

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A couple of summers ago I visited south Cornwall, where we took some beautiful walks along the South West Coast Path.  Maintained by the National Trust and spanning 630 miles, the path connects walking trails through Dorset, Devon, Cornwall and Somerset.  The coast path follows picturesque and scenic routes along cliff tops and beside beaches […]

Top Posts

Llechwedd Slate Caverns

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The Llechwedd Slate Caverns are an old mining network under the mountains of Snowdonia. The caverns and tunnels are hewn from the solid rock of the mountains.   Llechwedd lies in the town of Blaenau Ffestiniog, once the largest town in north Wales after Wrexham, but its population fell with the decline of the slate […]

Cambridgeshire

The Mill Pond

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This is one of my favourite places in Cambridge, the Mill Pond.  Here the River Cam splits, meandering around a meadow at the back of Queen’s College and forming a pool beside the Silver Street bridge.  From there the river flows on under the bridge, and in the other direction through the Backs, passing alongside […]

Luxembourg

Luxembourg Elephants

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Last summer there was a wonderful display of colourful elephant statues around the city of Luxembourg.  The statues were commissioned as pieces of artwork to raise awareness of environmental and conservation issues. Here are photos of many elephants I saw around the city while I was visiting.  It was really fun to spot the elephants […]

Cambridgeshire

Waterbeach

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For Mothers’ Day we visited fields of rare hyacinths, grown in Waterbeach.  The fields north of Cambridge become Fenland, with rich fertile black soil and flat land.  This region was marsh, drained and reclaimed during the seventeenth century.  It is still low-lying and intersected by rivers and streams, with roads raised up above the level […]

United Kingdom

Bath, Somerset

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Bath is a picturesque city with famous Georgian architecture and Roman baths.  It is a spa city, built on a natural spring. Notable sights of Bath include the Roman baths, Bath Abbey, the Pulteney bridge, the Circus and the Royal Crescent.  Here are some photos taken as I wandered around the city. The rotunda design […]

Luxembourg

Luxembourg City (1)

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Last July I visited Luxembourg City for the wedding of two friends. It was the first time I had been around in Luxembourg properly rather than just passing through. My friend Tom collected me from the station and we drove past the European Court.  I hadn’t been in continental Europe since early summer 2009, and […]

United Kingdom

Grafty Green

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Last weekend I went to a wedding in Kent.  The couple are friends of my girlfriend, and it was a lovely occasion that took place in a large country house.  After the wedding we had an opportunity to go looking around some of the surrounding villages in Kent, so went out for a drive in […]

Cambridgeshire

Stetchworth

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In Stetchworth I park by the church. Wandering through the village, sounds of home lives filter out through open doors. Someone is listening to a cricket match on a television or radio, and in another house someone is playing their piano. A child is learning to ride a bike, riding wobbling along the pavement, pursued […]

Cambridgeshire

Dullingham

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I visit the village of Dullingham one hot day in late July.  It is a village of flint walls and chocolate-box cottages.  Horses are neighing from stables, and bells chime in the church. I wander through the sleeping village, in the thick hazy heat of the afternoon.  Roses tumble from flint walls, in their last […]

United Kingdom

Roman Baths, Bath

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Recently I visited the city of Bath, in Somerset, for the first time. In ancient times Bath was the site of a hot spring, a place treated as a shrine by Iron Age Britons.  A temple was built on the site in 60-70AD, during the Roman occupation of Britain.  A complex of public baths gradually […]

United Kingdom

Cowlinge

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Next I drove to Cowlinge, a particularly pretty village in Suffolk.  It was midday on a Friday, and I’d expected the village to be deserted on a week day.  However there were many people out and about: mowing lawns, riding horses, walking dogs, cycling, mending walls. This is the old blacksmith’s cottage. This is the […]

United Kingdom

Great Bradley

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This is my first post in a series on English villages. I think many people don’t realise how beautiful Britain is, including a proportion of those that live here, and I want to share through photography some of the beauty I see here. I don’t live anywhere dramatic, not in those parts of the British […]

Cambridgeshire

Cambridge

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To celebrate the birth of the new Prince of Cambridge, yesterday, 22nd July 2013, here is a post on the city that is his namesake. I had to leave Mumbai to find more work, but once I got home to Cambridgeshire I decided to continue looking at places with the eyes of a traveller, even […]